Review: Shump Vol 1: Strange Animal

Shump, by local favourite James Zintel.

Art

James is a pro.  No, not a hooker, he makes a lot of great sequential art and the quality is of a professional level.  James creates a pleasant reading experience, each pages flows well and is easy to read.  His style is crisp, characters move and convey emotion, each page visually interesting.  Colours compliment the fantastic worlds built within the pages of Shump.

Story

Three Blobits touch and Shump is pulled away from his comfortable life into a strange wasteland plagued by outlaw robots, he eats tacos, falls down, and get hit by a Poké Ball.  Shump tries to avoid any responsibility, but can’t escape himself, or situation.  This story is about the importance of understanding one’s self.  James has great comedic timing with his stories, his art and humour compliment each other to create something special.

Reaction

I had a lot of fun reading Shump and rate it 3,000,000 robot arms.  You can find a digital copy here, but I recommend you grab the trade.  James posts a lot of art on Instagram and Facebook, check it out!

Review: The Adventures of Auroraman #1

The Adventures of Auroraman #1 by Jeff Burton

Heritage Moments First Flight by Justin Shauf & Donovan Yaciuk

Auroraman #1 Contributors include: Justin Shauf, Donovan Yaciuk, Shay Hahn, Corbin Shauf, Madelyn Yaciuk, Elaine Will, Sharon Gauthier, Christopher Yao, Dan Collins, A.P Fuchs, & Jason Sylvestre.

It Came From Dead Moose Lake by Shay Hahn & Donovan Yaciuk

Art

This comic packs a lot of punch within the 64 pages printed!  It’s an anthology book with all stories centered around Auroraman.  Heritage Moments: First Flight opens the book with Justin Shauf‘s strong traditional super hero look, complimented by Donovan Yaciuk‘s interesting choice use a Golden Age aesthetic when colouring.  It Came From Dead Moose Lake, by Shay Hahn, shifts gears to an indie style in a story that would look at home along side Top Shelf titles.  CBC Books Presents gives is a fun story, a father/son collaboration between Corbin and Justin Shauf gives a lot of heart to the short.  Bugs in the Park by the wonderful Elaine Will looks fantastic, as her art always does (see the review on her book, Arkade).  Sharon & Dan’s Adventures of lil’ Auroraman look stylistically like 90’s Saturday morning cartoons were put in a blender with anime.  Summer Chill by Christopher Yao gets the book back to a more traditional superhero look.  Next we have Mr. Sylvestre creating some art with The 3D Adventure, yes a freaking, 3 (glasses included with the comic)D, story!  Prelude to a Storm ends the book with Justin getting back to the superhero vibe.

Bugs in the Park by Elaine Will

Story

The Adventures of Auroraman has a focus on exploring the Auroraman character’s origins, family life, and world.  Recognizing Saskatchewan geography within the pages is oddly exciting.  For example, seeing Humboldt’s Lighthouse Water Tower is not something I would expect to read in a comic, it’s oddly neat seeing local landmarks represented by local comic creators.

Summer Chill by Christopher Yao

Reaction

I had a lot of fun reading the Adventures of Auroraman.  There is a lot of value in the comic, and a lot of reasons for different demographics to read it.  It’s kid friendly, it has a lot of local flavor, and it has a 3D STORY!  I rate this comic one MASSIVE undead moose.

Review: Genreville

Genreville is a comic created by Saskitonian Huw Evans.  You can contact Huw or learn more about this project through his website, http://eyecat.com/.

Art

Ink!  Oh man can Huw ink a page!  There is a lot of depth here, and the inks are a big part of it.  They compliment his character designs, which remind me of old Mad Magazine, but stylistically are much different.  Huw effectively puts a unique spin on genre tropes to ground the character’s in their setting, while simultaneously hinting at each character’s history.  There is a clever short hand here, providing a lot of story within “Genreville”.

Story

The story moves fast, pacing is breakneck in this genre-jumping tail.  Jack Crandall is a dick, literally, it’s his job, and it sends him on a journey with a giant woman, a mad scientist, zombies, greasers, party teens, a pirate and a jungle woman.  A lot happens in this comic, but the scenes never feels forced.  Huw leverages cliches to great effect, keeping a consistent feel of across the comic.

Reaction

I had a lot of fun reading this nod to 50s pulp, Huw blends a lot of gags in the background of the story and keeps me engaged with fast pacing.  The setting is established immediately, letting us know the story will be surreal, to keep the reader for each crazy twist.  I rate Genreville eight sea monkeys.  If you like it, you may also like the film Instruments of Evil which Huw created.